It's not responsible at this point for me to continue giving you a platform on my own Medium page, especially considering that the vast majority of the harm that's being done to trans people right now won't touch me; I got mine, basically, I am physically safe, and that's why I can discuss these things without getting emotional. And that's not fair at all to those who haven't, and can't. All I'm doing is giving you space to post stuff that's, at best, triggering for the trans fems and other trans people who aren't living in such safe environments on my own page, which is not what this space is for.

So, because I'm sure somebody else is reading this: no, I'm not blocking you because I'm a coward, I'm doing it because arguing with trolls is an unhealthy behavior; you're basically an internet cigarette that I keep coming back to smoke, and because I only got paid about $1.50 by Medium for whatever surge of views brought you to this article.

The questions you're asking are not relevant to the article, and to expect me to answer them fully is to expect me to be-- in addition to a trans man-- a historian and a sports researcher, in the same way that the constant questions comparing trans people to Rachel Dolezal were weird when directed at unprepared white trans people who don't have a background in critical race theory. Trans people have avoided discussion about sports for decades and left it to the realm of "bro science" largely because most of us are awful at, and know nothing about, sports, after being discouraged all our lives from participating at every level.

The best source I've seen on trans athletes is here: https://thenib.com/gender-divisions-in-sports-trans-athletes/

The question about sex is more complex, because it requires both your understanding and mine of what sex is, what gender is, and what it means to be transgender to be fully laid out. I expect them to be entirely different, and in ways that are difficult to describe, because we use entirely different language to talk about these things. This is the best attempt I've made, myself: https://owl-nightjar.medium.com/flipping-the-hamburger-2744a2ebc3d

Language is important, of course, because it's one of the things that allows GCs to cloak transphobia and transmisogyny in particular in language that sounds civil, to fight for laws and social practices that do real harm to trans people while claiming to love us. Claiming that the rights we're fighting for aren't rights at all, but special privileges.

You know, like when same-sex marriage was still illegal in the US, conservatives would say, "that's not a right, that's a special privilege-- gay people can still marry someone of the opposite sex!"

Which brings me to reason I'm responding to this at all; I'm intrigued that you brought up marriage. Because the situation you're describing isn't privilege, it's more of a catch-22, and somewhat of a rare one.

It suggests that you're jealous of someone's marriage in particular, otherwise why bring up such a weird point?

Same-sex marriage was legalized in the US in 2015. This was not that long ago; it was until very recently really not okay to be gay. I think most people know this. I'm not sure why anyone would assume that the trans rights movement had pulled ahead of the mainstream gay rights movement before same-sex marriage was legal: most people still didn't know the word transgender yet. Hell, a lot of trans people didn't use the word transgender until the mid 2000s, despite it having been coined in the '60s. It was still common to blame trans people wanting any rights at all for "dragging the gay rights movement down."

One of the requirements of the old gender clinics was divorce, to get any sort of treatment at all. After those programs ended you still, in most places, couldn't legally change your sex if you were married. In the UK, today, you can not legally change your sex without your spouse's consent.

So what happened to you if you were one of the rare trans women who managed to hold herself together well enough to marry a woman before coming out, and you came out before 2015, and your wife turned out to be both accepting that you are trans and still into you as a woman?

Or, alternately, you're an out trans woman who wants to marry a cis woman, but you haven't had your documents changed.

Well in the first case, most likely you have to choose between changing your documents and getting a divorce. Not changing documents means being outed as trans every time you need to show ID, risking being assaulted, denied service, and denied jobs... and I think everybody is aware of the legal benefits of marriage. In the second, being legally male isn't necessarily going to work as a loophole. Plenty of folks would still see two brides and refuse to marry them. The former issues still eventually come up.

Those who got married before same-sex marriage was legalized and transitioned afterward, to find they were loved and accepted: yes, they got to be with their partners all that time. They also lived, all that time, with dysphoria, with the fear that they would be abandoned when they came out, with the emotional hell that is trying to live as men when they are not. If you do not believe dysphoria is real (since it is so often presented as emotional manipulation or a temper tantrum), if you do not know how bad it can fuck you up, destroy your ability to function entirely, I know this is meaningless to you.

Well, unless you know full well what dysphoria feels like but you aren't willing to acknowledge it yet. Because you're awfully obsessed with trans people, and you may want to examine your own relationship with gender for a bit and think about why that is.

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trans activist pig, sex maze wizardfucker. (he/him)

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owl

owl

trans activist pig, sex maze wizardfucker. (he/him)

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